Tempranillo [temp-rah-nee-yo]

TEMPRANILLO. [Pronounced: temp-rah-nee-yo]

A Spanish grape varietal, generally producing wine with slightly savoury characteristics. While Spanish versions usually reflect more leather, cherries and earthiness, Australian winemaking and terroir tends to product more fruit-driven examples with black cherry and blueberries driving the palate.

Medium bodied and with decent (but not usually overwhelming) tannins, it could be considered Spain’s answer to Italy’s sangiovese and complements the food of its country: chorizo, tapas, spicy seafood, paella, tacos, burritos… you get the drift. Generally more responsive in warmer climates, the Australian regions with most success making tempranillo are the Adelaide Hills, McLaren Vale, Heathcote and Margaret River.

A TRULY TASTY TANTALISING TEMPRANILLO!

A singing tempranillo to try out this summer is from the Willunga 100 vineyard in the McLaren Vale. Crack it open at your afternoon barbeque, and because it compliments food so well, you can enjoy it with just about anything (although it really shines with Spanish and Mexican flavours). It’s another great drop from wine‑maker Mark Farmilo, who has recently been working alongside Willunga in their winemaking.

The wine is highly accoladed: 93 points & five stars from Wine Orbit; 91 points from Patrick Eckel; 90 points from Huon Hooke and the 2017  vintage has recently scored 95 points and Gold with James Halliday!

“Excellent colour; very precise black cherries, spices and darker berries on the back-palate, fine but firm tannins. Will relish time in bottle, and its great balance willstand it in good stead. Quality oak, too.” – JAMES HALLIDAY, 1ST AUGUST 2019.

https://www.vendimia.com.au/products/24337-willunga-100-tempranillo/

 

Meet the maker… Mike Farmilo

Meet the maker… Mike Farmilo, McLaren Vale SA.

Mike Farmilo is the un-sung hero behind both Monterra Wines and Colab & Bloom, the funky McLaren Vale brand he and his business partner, Norm Doole established in 2015. Indeed, Mike Farmilo has flown under the vinous radar for four decades despite an extensive career that began at Angove after he graduated from Roseworthy College in 1977. A stint at Seaview saw Farmilo fall in love with McLaren Vale, an affair that’s remained ever since. Farmilo was recruited from Seaview into the challenging role of Group Red Winemaker with the industry giant, Southcorp — now part of Treasury Wine Estates.

It was at Southcorp that Mike’s talents came to full fruition with the responsibility for the benchmark red wines of Penfolds, Lindemans, Seppelt and Wynns. Farmilo was deeply involved with crafting Penfolds’ iconic Grange and instrumental in winning two Jimmy Watson trophies, the highly prized Melbourne Wine Show’s ‘Top Young Red’ trophy. To cap off his Southcorp career, Farmilo was crowned McLaren Vale Bushing King in 1994 as maker of the Championship Wine of the Show. Retiring from Southcorp in 1997 wasn’t for Farmilo, so he turned his focus to numerous projects that have kept him busy over the last 20 years including vintages in Germany, California, France and Chile. Mike has judged at dozens of Wine Shows across the country, including chairing the Australian Small Winemakers Show in Stanthorpe.

While the Monterra portfolio includes traditional French shiraz, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay and pinot noir, it’s Italianate grapes that are catching Farmilo’s attention with pinot grigio and nero d’Avola adding spice to his winemaking endeavours. Under the Colab & Bloom banner Farmilo pushes well beyond the boundaries of corporate winemaking with tempranillo and garnacha (aka grenache) shining. Farmilo is back in the zone and loving it — enjoying the fruits of his labour.

Check out our Mark Farmilo wine picks: 

Monterra Reserve Black Label Shiraz  

Colab and Bloom Grenache

Willunga 100 Tempranillo

Inside Australia’s Wine Awards: Agricultural Wine Shows

By Peter Bourne.

The origins of the Australian wine show system date back to the early 19th century, when they were a small part of the agricultural shows set up to improve the breed – be it cattle, sheep, wheat, wool or wine. The Sydney Royal Wine Show has been running since 1826 and is managed by the Royal Agricultural Society of New South Wales. The RAS website claims the Society has been ‘an influential force in the direction and development of Australian agriculture through competitions, education and events since its foundation in 1822.’ Other capital cities followed their lead.

However, over time, these wine shows have morphed from their original purpose to become a marketing tool used by wine producers keen to encourage hesitant consumers to buy their brand. This coming August the 2019 KPMG Sydney Royal Wine Show chairman P.J. Charteris will lead a highly qualified group of 24 judges and associates in the blind tasting of 2200 wines. The wines will be tasted in classes (variety and style) by 3 judges each to determine which of the 20, 50 or more wines in the class should be awarded a bronze, silver or gold medal.

In the ‘olden days’ a pencil, rubber and clipboard were the tools — in the modern age i-Pads are the go. Traditional scoring was out of 20 (more about the 100 point system soon) — 3 points were awarded for colour & condition, 7 for aroma & bouquet and 10 for flavour. Wines that scored less than 14 were considered N.B.M. (nil by mouth) i.e. faulty and undrinkable. Nowadays our university trained winemakers ensure very few wines fall into his group. Around half the wines will be deemed a decent wine within the parameters of the class and scored between 14.1 to 15.4. The real action starts at 15.5 with a wine scoring up to 16.9 awarded a bronze medal, those between 17.1-18.4 a silver and above 18.5 a converted gold medal. Typically 25-40% of entries will score a bronze, 5-10% a silver and just 3-5% a gold medal. The tasting of the 2200 wines will go on for 3 days with each judge tasting 300-400 wines — a gruelling process, believe it or not! Gathering their tired tongues on the 4th day, all the judges taste the gold medal wines to determine the trophy winner for that class, or group of classes. Trophy winners are then eligible for the white or red wine of the show and finally the top gong — the wine of the show. Exhausted, the judges retire to the pub for a beer.

Extract from Vendimia Harvest Issue No8.

Summertime…

– With Peter Bourne

The warmer weather of our summer months lures us out of our wintery shells into the dazzling sunshine – and the heat. Cool flavours are what we seek – be it food or drinks. When it comes to food, the duo of Australia’s abundance of seafood and our incredible array of multicultural cuisines offers fresh, bright flavours that suit the balmy weather. Oysters, prawns, tuna, salmon and all-sorts of cephalopods – served a la natural or cooked with exotic spices and served with a wedge of lemon.

The barbecue becomes the focus with grilled sausages, chops and steaks served with simple salads. In fact, led by cooks like Yotam Ottolenghi, those salads are becoming more complex with healthy grains and pulses giving them the protein boost for a stand-alone lunch or for a light evening meal.

So let’s explore the amazing range of summertime wines. Oh, and remember to cool your reds on a blazing hot day…..

PICNICS

Outdoor eating takes on a whole new guise when it’s packed in a picnic basket, lugged for miles before being set up in a cool, grassy glade. Equally heavy is the mandatory Australian icon — an Esky brim full of cold beer and appropriately chill-able wines.

One of the best tips when matching food and wine is to balance the weight of the wine with the complexity of the food. Picnic food is fresh and tasty, so select equally refreshing whites and juicy, light-framed reds. That hefty basket may include a quiche, frittata, pâté, terrine, a plethora of charcuterie and some stinky cheese.

Pop the cork on an Angullong Sparkling Rosé to salve the thirst before moving on to a crisp white such as the Nine Yards Sauvignon Blanc.

Eschew your heavyweight shiraz and cabernets for alfresco reds that welcome a gentle chill. Pull them out of the icy Esky to allow them to come up a few degrees before serving. The savoury, spicy Colab & Bloom Grenache works well with salami or pork and pistachio terrine. Pair the raspberry and aniseed flavoured Willunga 100 Tempranillo with a Manchego cheese for a true Iberian experience.

One of the great benefits of Australian winegrower’s universal move to the screwcap is that forgetting a corkscrew is no longer the picnic disaster that it was in the olden days of cork!

SEAFOOD FEAST

Australia’s incredible wealth of seafood offers the opportunity to indulge in a feast of fresh and simply cooked crustacean, whole fish and other underwater treats. Oysters are a delicious starter and just perfect with a crisp, dry riesling from the Eden or Clare Valleys. The riesling’s citrus bright acidity replaces the need for a squeeze of lemon. Semillon is another wonderful seafood white — try a zippy young Hunter Valley semillon with a salt and pepper squid. Sauvignon blanc is equally seafood friendly – try the Leura Park Estate Sauvignon Blanc with a Thai style prawn and glass noodle salad.

Whole fish makes a great centre point to a seafood feast. Pair breezy white like the Buller King Valley Pinot Grigio with a snapper spiced with lemongrass and ginger or a delicate pinot noir with a whole baked Tasmanian salmon. The pinot’s mildmannered tannins and tangy acidity will cut through the oily (Omega 3 rich) texture of the salmon like a hot knife through butter. Speaking of butter, if the budget allows, split a fresh crayfish and grill it with a smothering of herb infused butter. Serve it with a buttery ‘old-school’ chardonnay for a marvellous food and wine match. Salmon also lends itself to Japanese dishes like sashimi or sushi – serve with lightly chilled sake for a nice (nationalistic) match. Salmon also shines as the base for Nordic-inspired gravlax. Damien Pignolet, of Claude’s and Bistro Moncur fame, marinated the salmon in sauvignon blanc for his legendary gravlax – so there’s an obvious synergy in serving a savoury sauvignon blanc.

Bouillabaisse is the ultimate seafood dish, its gusty (saffron) spiced flavours typically paired with an acid-etched Beaujolais Nouveau. An alternative is a frisky rosé with soft redcurrant flavours and an incisive acidity to cut through the seafood rich bouillabaisse and its garlic-laced aioli. Serve by lapping water to emulate a truly Mediterranean experience.

LONG & LAZY SUMMER LUNCH

School and public holidays offer the opportunity to invite family and friends for a long, lazy lunch. Kick things off with a fruity, low-alcohol wine like moscato or an offdry riesling (labelled as kabinett in Germany) with those from the Mosel the exemplar of the style. Served well chilled, the wine’s sweet’n’sour flavours echo those of an icy lemon sorbet. Served at 11am with a platter of fresh fruit, at 5-7% alcohol, an extra glass or two of moscato won’t impede the pleasures of a lengthy lunch.

Step the pace up a bit with a Champagne or sparkling wine. Australia’s top bubbles stand proudly alongside the French stuff, as they’re made with the same grape varieties using the methode traditionelle technique. The only thing missing in Australia is Champagne’s terroir Defining chalk. Serve the Saddler’s Sparkling Chardonnay Pinot Noir with freshly shucked Port Stephen’s oysters for the ultimate palate cleanser.

It’s time for an entrée – perhaps a retro prawn cocktail served on a bed of shaved iceberg lettuce and doused in Marie Rose sauce. A crisp dry rosé such as the Leura Park Estate Rosé is a blushing companion to the equally rosy prawn cocktail.

Turkey and ham sneak their way into many family lunches with yester-year’s roast vegetables replaced by complex salads in the Ottolenghi style. A fuller white such as Monterra Chardonnay would work with the dense protein of the turkey. However, for a curved ball, try a sparkling red with the ham. The French despise the concept but sparkling red is as Australian as an Akubra hat. Sparkling reds are traditionally made with shiraz but the Saddler’s Creek team use cabernet sauvignon as the base for their Bluegrass Sparkling — and it’s a ripper. Serve the ham with your choice of mustards and don’t over chill the Bluegrass.

Now for dessert, a rare course for a weeknight meal, but the mandatory finale to a long lunch. Grandma’s pudding is legendary, usually accompanied by a brandy infused custard. Now’s the perfect moment to serve that port stuck at the back of the drinks cupboard. Buller Tawny is lush and plush, its raisiny flavours just perfect with grandma’s pudding. It’s now time for an afternoon nap.

Meet neighbours Hobbs and Chris Ringland

We would like to introduce you to winemaking legend Chris Ringland’s long-time neighbours and friends: the Hobbs family.

The Hobbs story began in 1998 when winemakers Greg & Allison Hobbs had their neighbour (and outstanding winemaker!!) Chris Ringland make their first few vintages. The Hobb’s vineyard is situated at the top of the Barossa Ranges, overlooking Flaxman’s Valley. With vines over a century old, the grapes grown on this course yellow soil get richer and more distinctively Barossa-flavoured as the decades roll by.

Since then, Chris has guided their path in the winemaking game, joining them as consultant & friend on their journey to creating some of the Barossa’s best boutique wines. Greg Hobbs is now one of the few Australian winemakers to attempt an Amarone style shiraz (where the fruit is semi-dried until it is similar to raisins) to produce a richer, deeper and more complex wine.

Chris Ringland also produces iconic Barossa wine in very small batches (think 700 to 1000 bottles per year) and was once given a score of 100 Points by American wine critic Robert Parker. Combined, this dynamic duo produce some remarkable wine just oozing with rich, fruity Barassa Valley goodness.

Check our our ‘Festive Neighbours’ pack which includes a selection of Hobb’s and Ringland’s premium red wines, and is an amazing introduction into wine in this price bracket for only $399 per half-dozen case.

Or see our full range of Hobbs wines, including 2 Amarone style Shiraz’s & a viognier that is enough to convert any wine drinker that white can be more serious than red!

Comparing your Shiraz’s

While many wine drinkers make their wine selection simply based upon a preferred variety (a nice pinot noir over a merlot for example) they can sometimes be quite surprised by the results in the bottle. And why should we find this unusual? While all wine labels must clearly state the variety, vineyard & vintage, they can never truly represent all the specific characteristics of a wine deeply shaped by their growing region and vintage. In this short review of three of our beautiful–yet–different featured shiraz offerings, Peter Bourne introduces us to the wonderful world of terroir…

HUNTER VALLEY, NSW – OAKVALE SHIRAZ ’17

The Hunter Valley is regarded as the birthplace of Australian wine and is undoubtedly a great example of terroir. Why? Because on the face of it the warm, humid climate of the Hunter Valley is not conductive to winegrowing, with sub-tropical storms in the peak January/February growing season diluting flavours and increasing disease pressure. However, in the dry years, such as 2014, the afternoon cloud cover and cool overnight temperatures slows the ripening process so the grapes build more flavour. Flavours of Hunter shiraz are variously described as savoury/umami, or in the ‘olden’ days — sweaty saddle and cow shed. The 2014 is in the former mould, with intense wild blackberry flavours, hints of clove and a taut tannin structure. Drink now with a rare steak or cellar for five or more years.

 

MCLAREN VALE, SA –MONTERRA RESERVE SHIRAZ ’17

Although the Barossa and McLaren Vale are just hours apart, there’s a distinct difference between the two winegrowing regions, with shiraz being the perfect mirror to compare the two terroirs. McLaren Vale is unashamedly hot in summer but the breezes off St Vincent’s Gulf moderate the heat, with the mix of sandy soils near the coast and more complex red and brown loams in the Clarendon Hills bringing a juicy, red & black fruit flavours with a more compact tannin profile. Mike Farmilo makes his Monterra Shiraz in the traditional style with oodles of flavours that just cry out for a barbecue – chops, sausages or a good hamburger.

BAROSSA VALLEY, SA – BETHANY EAST GROUNDS SHIRAZ ’16

While the more inland Barossa valley region enjoys the same warm conditions as the McLaren Vale, the combination of a more continental climate (with cooler nights) and its richer soil adds depth and power to the Barossa shiraz style. The Schrapel family have farmed the Eastern Hills of the Barossa Ranges for 150 years with the 2016 East Grounds Shiraz a  typically dense, intense shiraz with dark chocolate and black fruits bouquet, a rich compact core of equally dark fruits and a skein of compact tannins binding the wine together. Best with a leg of lamb and lots of roasted vegetables.

 

Isn’t Shiraz.. just Shiraz??

SHIRAZ IS AUSTRALIA’S MOST IMPORTANT GRAPE VARIETY – AND HAS BEEN FOR OVER 180 YEARS.

The key to its success is mainly shiraz’s versatility and willingness to reside in a wide variety of climates, from cool sites like the Great Southern, Grampian and Canberra districts to the temperate climes of the Clare Valley, Heathcote and Mudgee. Shiraz also thrives in our warmest regions like the Hunter & Barossa Valleys and McLaren Vale. Tasmania is the only state without any significant plantings of shiraz.  That said, the much lauded Jimmy Watson Memorial Trophy of 2011 went to the 2010 Glaetzer Dixon Mon Pere Syrah – much to the embarrassment of the Barossa boys that year.

But not only is shiraz viticulturally versatile, but it clearly reflects the dirt in which it’s grown, with an incredible range of flavours and styles — from the rich earthy flavours of Hunter shiraz to the litheframed, pepper-and-spice styles of the Frankland River area.

The traditional home of shiraz is the northern Rhône — its epicentre the famous hill of Hermitage where James Busby collected his seminal vine cuttings in December 1831. Busby’s plantings at Kirkton Park in the Upper Hunter spawned the remarkable legacy that has seen shiraz/syrah planted across the nation. The shiraz/syrah confusion has now been settled with DNA evidence proving they are the same grape variety. The research dates syrah back a millennia with its birthplace near Lyon. The myth that shiraz/syrah came from the Persian (now Iranian) city of Shiraz has now been laid to rest.

Nowadays shiraz generally flies solo in Australia, however historically it was often paired with cabernet sauvignon. The premise given was that shiraz gave rich, juicy flavours while the cabernet sauvignon gave structure, power and length. The introduction of merlot to Australia in the 1980’s saw cabernet sauvignon merlot replace the traditional ‘cab shiraz’ blends, although Penfold’s Bin 389 and Yalumba ‘The Signature’ still carry the flag.

Shiraz is also grown in the southern Rhône, and is one of the thirteen acknowledged varieties of the Cote du Rhône (and more celebrated, Châteauneuf du Pape) appellation(s). However, grenache is king in the warmer sites of the southern Rhône. Australian wine makers follow a similar path with their GSM blends (grenache, shiraz, mourvèdre), sometimes swapping the dominant grape to make a SGM or even MSG. Whatever the blend these lush, plush reds make perfect partners to pies, pizza, pasta or anything off the barbecue.

Shiraz takes on a sophisticated guise when a splash of viognier is added – a la Cote Rotie, one of the revered appellations of the northern Rhône. The local icon is Clonakilla, with Tim Kirk creating a whole new genre of shiraz with his slinky, subtle, spicy-laden take on the variety. Just 5-10% viognier is all that’s necessary — the results are astonishing.

Shiraz will remain at the top, not because we all love dense, warm blooded, high octane styles but because of its adaptability to different climates, different soils and most importantly to different winemaking philosophies. Viva la difference — be it shiraz or syrah.

Region Insight: Eden Valley

SO CLOSE TO THE BAROSSA… BUT SO DIFFERENT IN STYLE!

The Eden Valley is an amazing region, capable of producing perfect cool climate wines from Chardonnay to Zinfandel, but is also recognised for its beautiful Shiraz and Riesling.

Bordering the Barossa Valley, the Eden Valley’s altitude, cooler temperatures and cool nights produce wines with elegance and good acid structure. For most wine lovers, Eden Valley is
famous for dry, crisp Riesling and elegant Shiraz.

Many other varieties also do well here including Viognier, Roussanne, Tempranillo, Nebbiolo and Semillion. Thorn-Clarke, Henschke, Yalumba and Irvine Wines are doing great things in this extremely diverse region.

Regional Wine Shows, Special Purpose Shows & Competitions

Regional Wine Shows

While capital city shows accept entries from all over the county, the (smaller) regional shows are limited to the wines from their region. For instance the Royal Hobart Wine Show is a national show, while the Tasmanian Wine Show is limited to the Island’s wines. The Royal Adelaide Wine Show is national, while regional wine shows are run in the Barossa Valley, Clare Valley, Adelaide Hills, McLaren Vale and the Limestone Coast, which incorporates Coonawarra. The National Wine Show of Australia only accepts entries that ‘qualify through Australian regional & capital city wine shows, and special purpose competitions’ and is essentially looking for the best of the best.

Special Purpose Shows and Competitions

While the agricultural and regional wine shows are run on a not-for-profit basis, there are a number of commercial wine shows. The Australian & New Zealand Boutique Wine Show, the Sydney International Wine Competition, the National Cool Climate Wine Show, Australian Small Winemakers Show, the Canberra International Riesling Challenge and the Great Australian Shiraz Challenge are just a few of the names out there. All are professionally run, but consumers may be baffled by the difference between a small winemaker and a boutique one.

How important are these competitions for winemakers and vineyards?

While the winning of these awards can create a splash in the media, it is certainly not mandatory for winegrowers to enter into wine shows — and is actually a very costly process in terms of dollars, time and wine for the winemaker. Often small prestige producers with limited stock would rather sell via their cellar door. Large companies and those new to the business can gain attention by boasting of their gold medals and trophies, but on the flip side, a cult maker may not want to tell their dedicated customers their latest chardonnay scored just 14 points!! It happened to one of our iconic winegrowers and he’s never entered a wine show since.

The 100 Point System

What is this 100 point system I keep hearing about in the wine world??

Robert Parker Junior published the subscription-based Wine Advocate for over 30 years, predicated on his ability to pick winners. The great 1982 Bordeaux reds were overlooked by the traditional English wine critics, but Parker trumpeted their virtues. He was right, and his reputation was set in stone.

Parker began using a 100 point system, with all his top wines scoring in the high-90’s. Parker has awarded 100 points to the Chamber’s Rosewood Rutherglen Rare Muscat. The US-based Wine Spectator followed Parker’s lead with their 1995 Top 100 Wine of the Year awarded to the 1990 Penfold’s Grange with a rating of 97 points – a wine listed at $100 USD per bottle!!

Australian Wine Shows have now adopted the 100 point system with wines scoring less than 85 points in the N.B.M. category, a silver medal awarded at 90 points and a gold above 95. James Halliday follows the 100 point system, scoring the Morris of Rutherglen Old Premium Rare Liqueur Muscat at 100 points.

Victories versus value… is it worth it??

In reality, medals and trophies are only a guide and rarely take into account price. A $15 bottle can rub shoulders in the same wine-show class as a $150 bottle. Is the $150 bottle ten times as good? No—it may be better but the multiplier effect really doesn’t work with wine. Wines in the $10-$20 range are made to drink now and not necessarily cellared for a decade. Winning a medal — or even better, a trophy — is a quality guide but in the end, trust your palate and buy the wines that bring pleasure to you, your family and your friends.