Comparing your Shiraz’s

Posted: October 2, 2019

While many wine drinkers make their wine selection simply based upon a preferred variety (a nice pinot noir over a merlot for example) they can sometimes be quite surprised by the results in the bottle. And why should we find this unusual? While all wine labels must clearly state the variety, vineyard & vintage, they can never truly represent all the specific characteristics of a wine deeply shaped by their growing region and vintage. In this short review of three of our beautiful–yet–different featured shiraz offerings, Peter Bourne introduces us to the wonderful world of terroir…

HUNTER VALLEY, NSW – OAKVALE SHIRAZ ’17

The Hunter Valley is regarded as the birthplace of Australian wine and is undoubtedly a great example of terroir. Why? Because on the face of it the warm, humid climate of the Hunter Valley is not conductive to winegrowing, with sub-tropical storms in the peak January/February growing season diluting flavours and increasing disease pressure. However, in the dry years, such as 2014, the afternoon cloud cover and cool overnight temperatures slows the ripening process so the grapes build more flavour. Flavours of Hunter shiraz are variously described as savoury/umami, or in the ‘olden’ days — sweaty saddle and cow shed. The 2014 is in the former mould, with intense wild blackberry flavours, hints of clove and a taut tannin structure. Drink now with a rare steak or cellar for five or more years.

 

MCLAREN VALE, SA –MONTERRA RESERVE SHIRAZ ’17

Although the Barossa and McLaren Vale are just hours apart, there’s a distinct difference between the two winegrowing regions, with shiraz being the perfect mirror to compare the two terroirs. McLaren Vale is unashamedly hot in summer but the breezes off St Vincent’s Gulf moderate the heat, with the mix of sandy soils near the coast and more complex red and brown loams in the Clarendon Hills bringing a juicy, red & black fruit flavours with a more compact tannin profile. Mike Farmilo makes his Monterra Shiraz in the traditional style with oodles of flavours that just cry out for a barbecue – chops, sausages or a good hamburger.

BAROSSA VALLEY, SA – BETHANY EAST GROUNDS SHIRAZ ’16

While the more inland Barossa valley region enjoys the same warm conditions as the McLaren Vale, the combination of a more continental climate (with cooler nights) and its richer soil adds depth and power to the Barossa shiraz style. The Schrapel family have farmed the Eastern Hills of the Barossa Ranges for 150 years with the 2016 East Grounds Shiraz a  typically dense, intense shiraz with dark chocolate and black fruits bouquet, a rich compact core of equally dark fruits and a skein of compact tannins binding the wine together. Best with a leg of lamb and lots of roasted vegetables.

 

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